Whiskey Wild: Steel Doors and Windows ~ 1910 Q St

Update 7/2012: The steel doors and windows have been removed as part of construction happening on the building in what looks to be preparation for opening another bar here.

The lone bar near the railroad tracks at 19th & Q, Whiskey Wild, has been vacant and boarded up for years now. Driving by one day, I recognized the metalwork on the doors and windows as the work of Keith Peschel, who created the steel door series called, Under the Microscope, at a parking structure downtown.

This building was home to Peschel’s art before Whiskey Wild took it over, and his website includes good photos of the metalwork in its early (pre-graffiti) days; rockandiron.zenfolio.com/exteriors (see photos 23-25).

Title: (unknown)
Artist: Keith Peschel
Date: (unknown)
Media: Steel
Location: 1910 Q St


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Midtown Mosaic (3 of 4) ~ 2220 K Street

Part 3 of the Midtown Mosaic series focuses on several more sections of this expansive mural which includes the work of more than 60 artists. The project was conceived and coordinated by Sacramento’s Midtown Alley Project (MAP).

If you missed it, be sure to start with part 1 and part 2 of the Midtown Mosaic series.

Click on any photo to see a larger image.

In the center of MAP’s Midtown Mosaic mural is a map of a several block area in midtown. Ironically, I have yet to discover the artist for this central piece in the mural.

This young woman with the arresting gaze is titled, ‘Wishful Thinking’, and is the work of Skip Lee. Lee’s work grows from the Abstract Expressionists such as deKooning, Gootlieb, Kline and Rothko. His website’s gallery of paintings shows an interesting array of style within his inspirational abstract approach, I’m particularly drawn to the painting titled, V Mary. (skipleeart.com)

Whimsical heart-faces by Clare Bailey, aka the Guardian Angel of this mural.

Steve Memering painted a portrait of, Sophie, their family dog. You can see Steve and his porky pug, Sophie, in this video by Russ Andris. A dog portrait is not Memering’s usual subject matter. He is known for painting local Sacramento scenes as well as other images from his travels in his “fantasy realism” style. (www.stevememering.com)

The Queen of Diamonds was painted by Kristyne DiMeo. Kristyne works in many mediums; she paints, creates dolls, create masks, fiber arts, and paper arts. (http://www.kristynespalette.com)

Sacramento theater icon, The Crest, was painted by Allison Carlos. For nearly 100 years, the building that is home to the Crest has housed several theaters; starting as the Empress in 1912, then the Hippodrome, and finally opening as The Crest in 1949 (1). (allisoncarlos.com)

Watery fish image by David Hayes.

Two zebras on the Serengeti by Gabriella Bargellini.

A pineapple piece by an artist who remains a mystery so far.

Judith Monroe combined painting and photography to create this landscape image. (www.judithmonroe.com)

A field of bright sunflowers by Elaine Bowers.

A dead bird by David Hayes is an unexpected quirky image in the mural. These next two images are also by Hayes:

He gets my unofficial prize for the widest array of styles in his three pieces on the Midtown Mosaic mural.

This portrait of a serene looking woman with the blue head-scarf was created by artist Steve Duroncelet. The portrait was inspired by a photo of his wife and the heart background was inspired by pop artist, Keith Haring. (www.duroncelet.com)

This image has a great story behind it. In the early stages of the mural, as the graphic outline of the mosaic took shape along the wall, Sister Anne Sekul, from the group of nuns living in a house near-by, came over to learn about the project.She ended up contributing as an artist by painting the angelic looking portrait.

Striking floral by Karen Dukes, whose vibrant style is evident in her website gallery. My favorite is this butterfly. (www.karendukes.com)

This pomegranate image is signed by TMS.

Based on Russ Andris’ site, this image seems to be by Joel Bowman.

Next up, part 4 of the Midtown Mosaic series.


Title: Midtown Mosaic
Artist: 60+ different artists coordinated by Midtown Alley Project
Date: 2008/2009
Media: Paint
Location: Alley between K and L on 23rd Street


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(1) http://thecrest.com/history/index.cfm

Double L Eccentric Gyratory II ~ 6th & J

“Choreography of Steel” is how Architectural Digest describes the work of kinetic sculptor George Rickey (1). This piece by Rickey on the corner of 6th & J can appear, at first glance, to be another simple, static sculpture on a downtown corner. Stop and look for a moment, and you will see that the two L shapes move and shift in interesting ways:

The movement is slow, smooth, and unpredictable, evoking a mesmerizing quality of repetition and variation that captivates the viewer; like ocean waves, Rickey’s work responds to the same natural laws of motion and captivates the viewer with the same mesmerizing quality of repetition and variation. (Within the Poetry of Motion: George Rickey on Sculpture.org)

Watch the Double L move in this 3 minute video I filmed with my iPhone the other day:

Rickey built his sculptures to allow movement using gravity and two principles of physics, equilibrium and momentum (rather than motor-driven movement). With his use of counterweights and bearings, the sculptures move with the wind and the pull of gravity. He used specific design elements, such as the compound pendulum and weighting internally with lead, to achieve the movement patterns he desired. (2)

An article by Carla Hanzal in Sculpture.org quotes Rickey describing the shapes and movement he sought in creating his art:

“The object was for the pieces to perform as they could, and I wanted their movement to be slow, unhampered, deliberate—but at the same time unpredictable. As for shape, I wanted only the most ordinary shapes—simple, hackneyed, geometrical. I wanted whatever eloquence there was to come out of the performance of the piece—never out of the shape itself.” (3)

Rickey, quoted in Hanzal’s article, describes the element of “planned indeterminacy” (chance) in his work, and he relates that to how our understanding of the dimensions of reality have expanded over history:

The artist notes that in the year of his birth “there were only three dimensions: after Einstein, time became a fourth. If there is a fifth, surely it is chance…Planned indeterminacy is a component of my sculpture.” (4)

Sacramento’s Double L Eccentric Gyratory has several identical siblings in other cities including:

Cleavland has one-upped all of these cities with its TRIPLE L Eccentric Gyratory (click link to see a photo of the Triple L).

The best way to experience the amazing array of Rickey’s kinetic sculptures is through videos and images; click below to explore via Google Images and YouTube:

Title: Double L Eccentric Gyratory II
Artist: George Rickey
Date: 1981
Media: Steel
Location: 6th & J


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(1) http://www.bibliopolis.com/main/books/jmv_7242.html?id=cIHnYIxv
(2) http://www.sculpture.org/documents/scmag99/oct99/rickey/rickey.shtml
(3) http://www.sculpture.org/documents/scmag99/oct99/rickey/rickey.shtml
(4) http://www.sculpture.org/documents/scmag99/oct99/rickey/rickey.shtml

Midtown Mosaic (2 of 4) ~ 2220 K Street

Part 2 of the Midtown Mosaic series focuses on several more sections of this expansive mural which includes the work of more than 60 artists. The project was conceived and coordinated by Sacramento’s Midtown Alley Project (MAP).

If you missed it, be sure to read part 1 of the Midtown Mosaic series.

Click on any photo to see a larger image.

I love this portrait by GayLynn’ Ribeira. Visiting her website, I found many more gorgeous portraits, and this one of Sister Johnson is particularly striking. (www.gaylynnart.com)

This beautiful geometric abstract is by Andy Cunningham. The piece is not shown-off well in this photo because of the dust on the wall. (www.andy-cunningham.net)

Two more images by tattoo artist, Gorgeous George; a stylistic floral and the “eye in the middle of the sacred heart” (which is a smaller element of a larger piece). He has another piece you can see in part 1 of this series.

This piece is the work of local artist, Illyanna. (www.myspace.com/siyaclothing)

A small piece  by Evelyn Niehaus. She has a larger piece you can see in part 1 of this series.

A small piece by self-taught artist Hector Espinoza. This hunched figure is the icon from his website (www.freewillnow.net)

This piece is signed by Nate Feldman and reads “In the melting pot. From all the people of the world. So the arts will blend.” (natefeldman.com)

A piece by Thomas Roth who, as a significant supporter of the arts in Sacramento, was also a key figure in making the Midtown Mosaic mural happen.

One of three pieces on the mural created by David Hayes.

This vibrant wren image was painted by Andy Williams and is dedicated to his (then) soon-to-be-born first-child named Wren. (www.andywilliamspaintings.com/)

A colorful, funky piece by Eric Goodman. (www.ericgoodmanpaintings.blogspot.com)

A pair of odd humanoids by Shaun Turner, who has another piece you can see in part 1 of this series.

A serene crane along the river, with the Sacramento skyline in the far distance, by Marbo Bernard, an accomplished artist who immigrated from Japan in 1956. (www.marbosart.com)

Kathy McMahon painted this portrait of her daughter, Katie, and you can see artist and daughter in this video by Russ Andris. (www.facebook.com/pages/Portraits-by-Kathy-McMahon)

Two pieces by artists who remain a mystery so far.

This tall tree image was created by Brenda Boles, and another of Brenda’s signature tall trees appears on another section of the mural. (www.brendabolesart.com)

This reaching hands image was painted collaboratively by Claire Baily and Thomas Roth; two people instrumental in the creation of the Midtown Mosaic mural.

By the look of it, I suspect this is another small piece by Thomas Roth.

Two pieces by artists who remain a mystery so far.

Next up, part 3 of the Midtown Mosaic posts.


Title: Midtown Mosaic
Artist: 60+ different artists coordinated by Midtown Alley Project
Date: 2008/2009
Media: Paint
Location: Alley between K and L on 23rd Street


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