Category Archives: Mural

Ishi ~ 24th & Broadway

A wall over-looking a gas station parking lot is a surprising place for such a riveting mural as this one titled, Ishi, painted by Alex Forster (aka Cabrón). Cabrón was selected amongst a pool of entrants in a mural contest by the non-profit organization, Valley Vision, for the 16′ x 80′ external wall of their office building (which is next to the gas station).

The Art:

The contest called for a mural reflecting the Sacramento Valley, and Cabrón focused his piece on the history of the valley:

I wanted to do something about the past of the Sacramento Valley. The first thing that came to my mind was the Californian Gold Rush, the epiphany of the American Dream, which drew tens of thousands of people from all over the world to this area.

The clash with the Native American Peoples and subsequent permanent demographic changes that resulted from this fateful event in American/Californian history is best represented by “Ishi, the last of the Yahi”, who was called the last “savage” alive when he first emerged from the wilderness. (1)

Cabrón’s mural invites us into the story of what happened to Ishi, his tribe, tribes throughout California, and Native American peoples across the entire continent when Europeans arrived in mass numbers. It was indeed a “permanent demographic change” that deserves our willingness to face the deeply disturbing events that happened in the Sacramento valley and throughout the United States.

The History:

One hundred years ago in August of 1911, Ishi appeared on a farm in Oroville unable to speak English or a known Native language (2). He was cited for vagrancy and put in the Butte County jail, but was released when anthropologists from San Francisco were able to identify him as a member of the Yana trip in the Deer Creek region (about 30 miles north west of Chico) (3). Ishi spent the remainder of his life at the University Museum in Berkeley and then at the San Francisco Anthropology Museum (4). He developed a relationship with the anthropologists who were appointed as his guardians, Alfred L. Kroeber and T. T. Waterman, and through him, they learned the story of the decimation of the Yahi people.

The tale Ishi told was grim. The Yana peoples suffered the complete loss of their lands and way of life when the Americans came during the Gold Rush… Ishi used to refer to the time of the American arrival as ‘when the stars fell.’ (5)

The Yahi initially numbered around 400. Lacking firearms, they were destroyed by four raids by armed white settlers. On August 6, 1865, seventeen settlers raided a Yahi village at dawn. In 1866, more Yahis were massacred when they were caught by surprise in a ravine. Around 1867, thirty-three Yahis were killed after being tracked to a cave. Finally, around 1868, four cowboys trapped about thirty Yahis in another cave. (6)

While still a child sometime in the 1870′s, Ishi’s own father was killed in a village massacre. The boy and his mother escaped by jumping into a nearby river. The Yahi who fought to preserve their territory against unequal odds and long range rifles were slaughtered until only a remnant band of 40 or so remained. The survivors of this tiny band hid successfully for nearly forty years, undetected by the outside world.” (7)

The decimation of the Yani people is mirrored in tribe after tribe throughout the history of the Gold Rush and the history of the European migration across America.

The Artist:

Cabrón spent his first 19 years in Vienna, Austria. Since then, he’s been on the road often but always doing art; comics for awhile and then, in his late twenties, he shifted to painting (8). Eventually he made his way to Sacramento, and his gallery page on A Bitchin’ Space describes the back-story for that move:

Cabrón, being an old school cynic from Vienna, firmly believes in the power of irony and consciously decided to move to Sacramento, the “city of gold”, at the height of recession and job scarcity in order to be a full time artist. (9)

In an interview with KVIE, Cabrón speaks to his experience with creating public art:

Public art is so accessible for everyone, anyone can enjoy it. It humbles me too because then I realize the full extent of my work, that I actually can touch someone with a piece of art. that’s what I love the most about it – is the interaction with people. (10)

Valley Vision:

Valley Vision is an ‘action tank’ that is “dedicated to securing the social, environmental and economic health of the Sacramento Region.”

Civic leadership at a regional scale: Valley Vision is a nonprofit association of people and organizations working to secure the social, environmental and economic health of the Sacramento Region. Founded in 1994, we are an objective, nonpartisan “action tank” committed to regional problem-solving as well as impartial research for sound decision-making. We act as a bridge, uniting neighbors and organizations that together can make a real difference in our communities.

Title: Ishi
Artist: Alex Forster (aka Cabrón) (www.cabron.us)
Date: 2010
Media: Paint
Location: 24th & Broadway


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(1) http://www.valleyvision.org/work/vvlocalart.html
(2) http://www.californiamuseum.org/Ishi_100
(3) http://www.californiamuseum.org/Ishi_100
(4) (http://www.theespresso.com/2011/09/ishi-commemorating-the-last-of-the-northern-california-yahi-indians-a-century-later/
(5) http://www.theespresso.com/2011/09/ishi-commemorating-the-last-of-the-northern-california-yahi-indians-a-century-later/
(6) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yana_people
(7) http://www.theespresso.com/2011/09/ishi-commemorating-the-last-of-the-northern-california-yahi-indians-a-century-later
(8) http://www.abitchinspace.com/cabron.html
(9) http://www.abitchinspace.com/cabron.html
(10) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edyZWAEEqm0

Mt. Diablo Sunset ~ 2220 J

Anytime of the day, you can travel along J Street and enjoy a ”Marty Stanley sunset” on this large mural. Marty Stanley, a foremost painter of the Sacramento delta, was well known for his paintings of delta sunsets (1). The full title of this mural is, “Mt. Diablo Sunset as seen from Bouldin Island at the confluence of the Mokelumne and San Joaquin Rivers” (2)

The Art:

“I seldom paint the land. I always focus on the water. It’s all about clouds and reflections on the water” (3). Like this mural, Stanley’s landscapes were usually streched horizontally to convey the long Valley and winding Delta waterways (4). Sarah Rohrs calls his work a “sublime marriage of water and sky.” (5).

The Artist:

At just 19 and with no formal training, Stanley, a native of the Sacramento delta, made a decision to pursue life as an artist. In 1988, he opened the Levee Gallery in Ryde, which is on the Sacramento River about 3 miles south of Walnut Grove. Stanely’s body of work includes more than 400 original images of the Delta (6). In addition to the panoramic sunsets like this mural, his also painted much of the nature, architecture and history of the Delta region. He collaborated with Charlie Soderquist to create the book “Sturgeon Tales, Stories of the Delta.” I was saddened to learn that Stanley suffered from mental illness and in 2006 he took his own life (7). You can read more about Stanley on his website: www.martystanley.com.

The Place:

Two places are important in this story: the specific place the mural captures and the Delta as a whole, where Stanley spent his life.

Stanley’s website quotes him describing the importance of growing up in the Delta to his work as an artist: “I believe it was part fate that my parents moved to Isleton when I was only three months old. I was meant to grow up here in the Delta” (8). Stanley attributes much of his stimulation and growth as an artist to the small Delta towns in which he grew up. “Little did I know then, but that atmosphere was offering me the building blocks of my young, formulating mind. It was feeding the creative side of me. It nourished me — the people, shops and restaurants were really fascinating. It was all the fabric of my life, very rich and diverse” (9).

To capture the image of this mural, Stanely stood at the confluence of the Mokelumne and San Joaquin Rivers. The Mokelumne River watershed begins in the Sierra Nevadas just south of highway 88 and flows through Lodi until it meets the San Joaquin. The name Mokelumne is from the Plains Miwok peoples. The San Joaquin River is over 365 miles long. The river starts in the high Sierras west of Fresno and releases into Suisun Bay near Pittsburg (10).

The map below shows Bouldin Island at the “A” pointer which is near the confluence of the Mokelumne and San Joaquin Rivers. Mt. Diablo is in the lower-left area of the map to the south west of Bouldin Island, and Sacramento is near the top of the map to the north.

Title: Mt. Diablo Sunset
Artist: Marty (M.C.) Stanley (www.martystanley.com)
Date: 2000
Media: Paint
Location: 2220 J


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(1) http://www.seeart.org/murals/artistsh.htm
(2) http://www.pbase.com/southyuba/image/88778017
(3) http://www.recordnet.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20011223/A_LIFE/312239994″
(4) http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2245&dat=19921123&id=q4EzAAAAIBAJ&sjid=KDIHAAAAIBAJ&pg=4409,2618935
(5) http://www.recordnet.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20011223/A_LIFE/312239994
(6) http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15966245
(7) http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15966245
(8) http://www.martystanley.com/right_nav/meet_the_artist/bio.htm
(9) http://www.martystanley.com/right_nav/meet_the_artist/bio.htm
(10) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Joaquin_River

Shine Mural ~ 14th & E

In blue, purple, green, and yellow, the intricate mural outside Shine cafe can keep a careful viewer occupied for a long while. It’s called, Ancient Futurism and is the work of local artist Shaun Burner (1).

The mural invites us to get up close and find some of the many mini-images that are integrated into the larger whole:

A face profile, cassette tape, and coffee mug.

Single die, envelope, and boat.

Coffee bean and conga drum.

Burner’s mural work can be found throughout downtown and has been featured on SacPedArt several times in the last year: Dimple Records, American Market, Midtown Mosaic, and (for a short while anyway) Sugar Plum Vegan Cafe.

He is part of a group called, Trust Your Struggle, which “is a collective of visual artists, educators, and cultural workers dedicated to social justice and community activism through the medium of art.”

Shine cafe opened in August 2010 in the recently re-developed Shine Building in Mansion Flats neighborhood (2). Other businesses in the building include Penleigh, a child-development center and preschool, and Yoga Seed Collective, a non-profit yoga studio (3). Shine cafe serves local food, fair-trade coffee, local art, and live music in a comfortable, living-room like atmosphere.


Burner completed Ancient Futurism in a couple of hours (4). Submerge Magazine quotes the artist talking about his painting process:

For me, this is meditation. It’s my tai chi. It’s a metaphor for life. Do the best you can with whatever you do. Don’t reflect on the past too much or worry about the future, but be present in this moment that is continually happening, and own that shit.(5)


Title: Ancient Futurism
Artist: Shaun Burner
Date: 2010
Media: Paint
Location: 1400 E Street


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(1)  http://submergemag.com/featured/bicycle-mural-tour-2012/6135/
(2) http://www.sacramentopress.com/headline/26494/Shine_Building_to_brighten_up_downtown
(3) http://www.sacramentopress.com/headline/38344/Yoga_collective_takes_root
(4) (http://submergemag.com/featured/bicycle-mural-tour-2012/6135/)
(5) (http://submergemag.com/featured/bicycle-mural-tour-2012/6135/)

Sac Evening Skyline Mural ~ 2316 C

A mural of the Sacramento skyline with evening stars and a bright moon welcomes customers entering the local printing business, J. Prassa Printers. The mural was painted by William Boddy in 2004 (1).

Boddy had his studio in Sacramento for some years and painted numerous murals around town including: the lobby of Cal Farm Insurance, a skating rink, and a dive shop (2). Boddy now resides in Salida Colorado.

J. Prassa has been a local Sacramento business for 30 years. They use sustainable practices including using only soy based inks and their paper stock includes 100% Post-Consumer Waste paper (3).

Title: (unknown)
Artist: William Boddy (www.williamboddy.com)
Date: 2004
Media: Paint
Location: 2316 C Strett


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(1) http://www.pbase.com/southyuba/image/127200564
(2) http://williamboddy.com
(3) http://www.jpprinting.net

CADA Mural ~ 7th & S

Sacramentans are gardening, biking, walking to work, restoring Victorian homes, and playing with pets and kids on the mural that graces the CADA Maintenance Office at 701 S Street. The figures in the mural are surrounded by trees and Golden poppies (the California state flower), and all of this is overlayed on a colorful grid map of downtown streets.

Local artists Sophia Lacin & Hennessy Chrisophel of Lacin Chrisophel Mural & Design completed the 3-panel mural in July last year. The main centerpiece is 40’x10′ and the right and left panels are both 19’x19′. The artists’ website has a great photo of all three panels together.

In this article in Sacramento Press, Lacin notes that the once blank wall now has personality; “it’s like a new person came to town.”

While Lacin and Chrisophel painted the mural, they met community members who came to watch the process unfold (1). On their blog, the artists describe the concept of the mural as:

a map of Sacramento that’s being brought to life with illustrations. The shadow of a hand on the leftmost section suggests the presence of the individual showing the influence one person can have, and the power of imagination. (2)

Capitol Area Development Authority (CADA) is an urban development and management company that functions as a self-supporting public agency seeking to build a fiscally, socially and environmentally sustainable neighborhood around Capital Park; which is loosely defined as bounded by L, S, 7th and 19th Streets (3). The organization’s tag line is:

CADA is committed to building a sustainable Capitol Park neighborhood that captivates city dwellers and inspires the people of California.

Lacin and Chrisophel have been active muralists since they opened their business in 2007. Last week’s ArtTake post on SacPedArt included the mural for Cuffs Urban Apparel which is also their work. The artists’ photo of the Cuffs mural is much better than the one on my post.

The website portfolio for Lacin Chrisophel Mural & Design includes over 15 different pieces around Sacramento, Davis, and Chico including:

The current work-in-progress for Lacin and Chrisophel is a 4-million gallon concrete water tank in Davis. The tank is about 135′ in diameter and 32′ high which equates to a square footage of 13,568 of blank canvas (click to see photo)! The artists post updated photos on their blog and plan to have live streaming video as well.

My favorite from their portfolio (both visually and because of the story behind it) is the mural they created pro bono for Volunteers of America Bannon Street Shelter; a shelter for families who are homeless. The mural is 35’x7′, covers the wall of the dining area, and faces the toddler’s play area (4).

Lacin and Chrisophel focused on inspiring the children when they designed the 4-panel mural. In this KCRA news video, the artists describe how each panel communicates a particular image for the children. The first panel is a garden scene about growth and health; the second is an education image; the third is a playground image about cooperation, friendship, and acceptance; and the fourth image is about individual inspiration and possibility.

In the video, the director of the shelter explains how the children at the shelter are often in a very uncertain and unstable time in their lives, and the images from the mural offer much needed help to “bring the children to the point of possibility in their lives” (5).

On their blog post for the CADA mural, the artists share a sentiment that is very connected to the heart of my motivation for exploring and blogging about public art in Sacramento:

“We believe in the transformative power of public art and hope that our piece will further develop the neighborhood’s identity.” (6)

Title: (unknown)
Artist: Sophia Lacin & Hennessy Chrisophel of Lacin Chrisophel Mural & Design
Date: 2010
Media: Paint
Location: 7th & S


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(1) http://sacramentopress.com/headline/32657/New_Community_Mural)
(2) http://lacinchristophel.blogspot.com/2010/07/final-cada-images.html
(3) http://www.cadanet.org/pdf/onlineVersion.pdf
(4) http://www.lcmuralanddesign.com/press/sacbusjournal.html
(5) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LysSJ_Jy4sU
(6) http://sacramentopress.com/headline/32657/New_Community_Mural

Midtown Mosaic (4 of 4) ~ 2220 K Street

Part 4 is the final post in the Midtown Mosaic series and focuses on several more sections of this expansive mural which includes the work of more than 60 artists. The project was conceived and coordinated by Sacramento’s Midtown Alley Project (MAP).

If you missed them, be sure to start with part 1, part 2, and part 3 of the Midtown Mosaic series.

Click on any photo to see a larger image.

A delta landscape created by Debra Hardesty.

One of my favorite pieces in the mural. This one is by Jeff Musser, who has another, similar piece in part 1 of this mural series. In this video by Russ Andris, Musser tells the story of the woman in this image, Jessica, and discusses the symbolism of the white roses. (www.jeffmusser.com)

A fun piece by Michelle Mackenzie. (www.mmackenziegallery.com)

One of two pieces on the mural by Jared Konopitski. (www.flickr.com/photos/jnoriko/4258004539/)

A second tall tree image was created by Brenda Boles, and another of Brenda’s signature tall trees appears on the part 2 post of the mural. (www.brendabolesart.com)

Looks like a little tree frog – this one is by Barry Smith who is primarily a gallery owner but jumped in as an artist for fun.

Cartoon piece by Seth Forester.

An unusual piece in the mural by Kristina McClanahan, one of the founders of Midtown Alley Project, and the “Goddess of the geometric design” of the Midtown Mosaic mural. This piece is part of her “Mug Shot Series”.

According to Russ Adris’ page, this piece looks like it was created by an artist named, Cartman.

These next 4 images were all created by by Gustavo Reynoso who runs Galeria Reynoso in downtown Sacramento. (gustavoreynoso.com)

Be sure to checkout Russ Andris’ cool panoramic photo of the entire mural. Andris also posted a 5 minute video panorama of the mural where he makes use of different zoom levels in order to show detailed views of many pieces as well as the larger mosaic view. If you have a Facebook account, visit MAP’s photo album to see photos of the mural’s progression from blank canvas to mosaic. MAP’s October 2008 blog post also contains some photos of the mural’s progression.

MAP honors Clare Bailey as the Guardian Angel of this mural for her efforts with coordination, support, and painting. Bailey is a galley artist and, Sacramento columnist, Bill Shallit, quotes Bailey’s dream of midtown public art where she “envisions a day when visitors can walk through midtown with headphones — like those available at museums — listening to art commentary on various midtown sites.” (1).

According to a recent Sacramento Press article, Claire’s dream is coming alive:

By early June, residents will be able to take walking tours of this growing outdoor gallery, thanks to tour maps being printed and posted online as part of the Midtown Alley Project (MAP) (2)

Keep your eye on Midtown Alley Project. The Sacramento Press article lists at least 5 more pieces that have gone in since Midtown Mosaic and more are to come: “Owners of at least three other properties are now talking with the MAP crew about adding public art at their spaces” (3)


Title: Midtown Mosaic
Artist: 60+ different artists coordinated by Midtown Alley Project
Date: 2008/2009
Media: Paint
Location: Alley between K and L on 23rd Street


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(1) www.istockanalyst.com/article/viewiStockNews/articleid/3455252
(2) http://www.sacramentopress.com/headline/50580/Public_art_grows_in_Midtown_alleys
(3) http://www.sacramentopress.com/headline/50580/Public_art_grows_in_Midtown_alleys

Midtown Mosaic (3 of 4) ~ 2220 K Street

Part 3 of the Midtown Mosaic series focuses on several more sections of this expansive mural which includes the work of more than 60 artists. The project was conceived and coordinated by Sacramento’s Midtown Alley Project (MAP).

If you missed it, be sure to start with part 1 and part 2 of the Midtown Mosaic series.

Click on any photo to see a larger image.

In the center of MAP’s Midtown Mosaic mural is a map of a several block area in midtown. Ironically, I have yet to discover the artist for this central piece in the mural.

This young woman with the arresting gaze is titled, ‘Wishful Thinking’, and is the work of Skip Lee. Lee’s work grows from the Abstract Expressionists such as deKooning, Gootlieb, Kline and Rothko. His website’s gallery of paintings shows an interesting array of style within his inspirational abstract approach, I’m particularly drawn to the painting titled, V Mary. (skipleeart.com)

Whimsical heart-faces by Clare Bailey, aka the Guardian Angel of this mural.

Steve Memering painted a portrait of, Sophie, their family dog. You can see Steve and his porky pug, Sophie, in this video by Russ Andris. A dog portrait is not Memering’s usual subject matter. He is known for painting local Sacramento scenes as well as other images from his travels in his “fantasy realism” style. (www.stevememering.com)

The Queen of Diamonds was painted by Kristyne DiMeo. Kristyne works in many mediums; she paints, creates dolls, create masks, fiber arts, and paper arts. (http://www.kristynespalette.com)

Sacramento theater icon, The Crest, was painted by Allison Carlos. For nearly 100 years, the building that is home to the Crest has housed several theaters; starting as the Empress in 1912, then the Hippodrome, and finally opening as The Crest in 1949 (1). (allisoncarlos.com)

Watery fish image by David Hayes.

Two zebras on the Serengeti by Gabriella Bargellini.

A pineapple piece by an artist who remains a mystery so far.

Judith Monroe combined painting and photography to create this landscape image. (www.judithmonroe.com)

A field of bright sunflowers by Elaine Bowers.

A dead bird by David Hayes is an unexpected quirky image in the mural. These next two images are also by Hayes:

He gets my unofficial prize for the widest array of styles in his three pieces on the Midtown Mosaic mural.

This portrait of a serene looking woman with the blue head-scarf was created by artist Steve Duroncelet. The portrait was inspired by a photo of his wife and the heart background was inspired by pop artist, Keith Haring. (www.duroncelet.com)

This image has a great story behind it. In the early stages of the mural, as the graphic outline of the mosaic took shape along the wall, Sister Anne Sekul, from the group of nuns living in a house near-by, came over to learn about the project.She ended up contributing as an artist by painting the angelic looking portrait.

Striking floral by Karen Dukes, whose vibrant style is evident in her website gallery. My favorite is this butterfly. (www.karendukes.com)

This pomegranate image is signed by TMS.

Based on Russ Andris’ site, this image seems to be by Joel Bowman.

Next up, part 4 of the Midtown Mosaic series.


Title: Midtown Mosaic
Artist: 60+ different artists coordinated by Midtown Alley Project
Date: 2008/2009
Media: Paint
Location: Alley between K and L on 23rd Street


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(1) http://thecrest.com/history/index.cfm

Midtown Mosaic (2 of 4) ~ 2220 K Street

Part 2 of the Midtown Mosaic series focuses on several more sections of this expansive mural which includes the work of more than 60 artists. The project was conceived and coordinated by Sacramento’s Midtown Alley Project (MAP).

If you missed it, be sure to read part 1 of the Midtown Mosaic series.

Click on any photo to see a larger image.

I love this portrait by GayLynn’ Ribeira. Visiting her website, I found many more gorgeous portraits, and this one of Sister Johnson is particularly striking. (www.gaylynnart.com)

This beautiful geometric abstract is by Andy Cunningham. The piece is not shown-off well in this photo because of the dust on the wall. (www.andy-cunningham.net)

Two more images by tattoo artist, Gorgeous George; a stylistic floral and the “eye in the middle of the sacred heart” (which is a smaller element of a larger piece). He has another piece you can see in part 1 of this series.

This piece is the work of local artist, Illyanna. (www.myspace.com/siyaclothing)

A small piece  by Evelyn Niehaus. She has a larger piece you can see in part 1 of this series.

A small piece by self-taught artist Hector Espinoza. This hunched figure is the icon from his website (www.freewillnow.net)

This piece is signed by Nate Feldman and reads “In the melting pot. From all the people of the world. So the arts will blend.” (natefeldman.com)

A piece by Thomas Roth who, as a significant supporter of the arts in Sacramento, was also a key figure in making the Midtown Mosaic mural happen.

One of three pieces on the mural created by David Hayes.

This vibrant wren image was painted by Andy Williams and is dedicated to his (then) soon-to-be-born first-child named Wren. (www.andywilliamspaintings.com/)

A colorful, funky piece by Eric Goodman. (www.ericgoodmanpaintings.blogspot.com)

A pair of odd humanoids by Shaun Turner, who has another piece you can see in part 1 of this series.

A serene crane along the river, with the Sacramento skyline in the far distance, by Marbo Bernard, an accomplished artist who immigrated from Japan in 1956. (www.marbosart.com)

Kathy McMahon painted this portrait of her daughter, Katie, and you can see artist and daughter in this video by Russ Andris. (www.facebook.com/pages/Portraits-by-Kathy-McMahon)

Two pieces by artists who remain a mystery so far.

This tall tree image was created by Brenda Boles, and another of Brenda’s signature tall trees appears on another section of the mural. (www.brendabolesart.com)

This reaching hands image was painted collaboratively by Claire Baily and Thomas Roth; two people instrumental in the creation of the Midtown Mosaic mural.

By the look of it, I suspect this is another small piece by Thomas Roth.

Two pieces by artists who remain a mystery so far.

Next up, part 3 of the Midtown Mosaic posts.


Title: Midtown Mosaic
Artist: 60+ different artists coordinated by Midtown Alley Project
Date: 2008/2009
Media: Paint
Location: Alley between K and L on 23rd Street


View Pedestrian Art, Sacramento in a larger map

Midtown Mosaic (1 of 4) ~ 2220 K Street

The Midtown Mosaic mural is truly an art mosaic, with over 60 different artists’ work spanning an 80’x10′ alley wall. The project was conceived and coordinated by Sacramento’s Midtown Alley Project (MAP). MAP was started by local artists Kristina McClanahan and Clare Bailey (1), and the group collaborates to bring beauty and culture to the Midtown neighborhood by creating outdoor venues for local artists to display their work.

MAP describes the mural, which was entirely a community effort and received no funding from city or government agencies:

The “Midtown Mosaic” mural showcases the work of over 60 talented artists. The various styles represented include tattoo inspired images, landscapes, portraiture, cityscapes, abstracts, whimsical pieces and one tile mosaic space. The variety of artistic styles and the diversity in subject matter gives this mural a broad range of appeal. (2)

Russ Andris has a wonderful panorama photo of the entire mural that gives a great feel for the overall effect.

I’ve photographed each section of the mural and researched many of the artists. I’ll be posting on the mural in a series of posts so each one is a smaller serving of art you can linger over. Like the mural, these posts are a bit of a mosaic. Keep reading, explore the photos, and click the links to read more about the works that draw your interest…

Click on any photo to see a larger image.


A geometric image created by Eva Rickert, who is a high school student, and the youngest contributor to the Midtown Mosaic.

The image, called ‘Newborn’, is the work of Laurelin Gilmore and on the MAP blog, Gilmore describes her work: “He is pulling back the curtain on a new morning, looking directly at the viewer despite the timidity apparent in his long, drawn down ears…. This is me, trumpeting the morning of my escape from old norms.” (www.laurelingilmore.com)

This tile-work piece is one of my favorites and was created by Marjorie Morblizter. Russ Andris posted a video interview with Morbitzer describing how the image is designed as if the viewer is looking out of a window and the woman is looking back in at the viewer from outside.

This floral is another of my favorites and was created by Barrett Manning. Manning describes his work in a video by Russ Andris. (barrettmanning.com)


The odd humanoid is the work of Shaun Turner and you can hear a little more about him in Russ Andris’ video. He painted a set of similarly styled twins on another part of the mural (see photos below). Sac Ped Art has featured Turner’s work several times, including: Dimple Records mural, American Market Mural, and the lost mural at 2309 K Street.

This wild Tibetan mask image was painted by tattoo artist, Wesley. The tattoo art on Wesley’s arms are actually the subject of a different piece in the mural by Jeff Musser (see below).

The circular cafe scene by Pat Orner is called Cafe’ Des Arts and was inspired by “Midtown’s many outdoor cafes and coffee houses.” You can hear Pat talk about her piece in this video by Russ Andris. (http://www.patornerart.com/)

One of two pieces on the mural by Jared Konopitski. (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jnoriko/4258004539/)

Based on Russ Andris’ page, I believe this critter is the work of Eric Goodman. (www.ericgoodmanpaintings.blogspot.com)

The multi-colored cityscape image was painted on an actual doorway that appears along the wall by Michael Misha Kennedy (who also painted the utility poles shown in the larger photo above). (www.mmkgallery.com)

The wild demon figures were created by Micah Young, and Russ Andris posted is a short youtube video interview of Young.

Keith Hopkins painted the neon sign of the Torch Club; Sacramento’s premier blues club established the year after prohibition ended in 1934. You can hear Keith talk about his piece and the challenge of working on the unique surface of the wall in this video by Russ Andris. (www.keithhopkinsart.com)

This haunting war image is the work of Rachel Vohland. The details have worn over time, but you can see a clearer close-up here.

Another piece created by Barrett Manning.

A piece by Westup.net. Looking closely, you can see that the Earth is being held by two hands and that the Sacramento skyline appears along the bottom of the image.

Based on Russ Andris’ page, I believe this is the work of Jasmine Beard.

This piece, another of my favorites, was created by Jeff Musser and features the tattooed arms of Wesley, the artist of the Tibetan masks above. In this video by Russ Andris, Musser expresses how much he got from the community aspect of participating in the mural. (www.jeffmusser.com)

This piece was created by tattoo artist, Gorgeous George. In the youtube interview by Andris, the artist describes that the image is dedicated to his niece and nephew. (www.myspace.com/inkbygeorge)

Two figures climbing around on the Sacramento city-scape is the work of Kevin Ward who, according to the MAP blog, uses “symbolic images that make the viewer aware of social issues and injustices.” (wardpaint.carbonmade.com)

The bright pink landmark of Rick’s Dessert Diner was painted by Evelyn Niehaus. Niehaus is self-taught artist who creates wonderful pen and ink architectural renderings, including an entire series of courthouse buildings, that can be viewed on her website. (artbyevelyn.com)

Cartoonist, Ryan, painted this one and the speech bubble reads, “Heros ain’t what they used to be”. If you look closely, you can see that the gun the figure is holding is actually a bolt in the wall that the artist incorporated into his piece.

In this video by Russ Andris, Jimmy Osborn, talks about the development of his cubist style demonstrated in this piece.

Based on Russ Andris’ page, I believe this is the work of Viki Asp.

Based on Russ Andris’ page, I believe this is the work of Jasmine Beard.

Next up, part 2 of the Midtown Mosaic posts.

Title: Midtown Mosaic
Artist: 60+ different artists; Coordinated by Midtown Alley Project
Date: 2008/2009
Media: Paint & Tile
Location: Alley between K and L on 23rd Street


View Pedestrian Art, Sacramento in a larger map

(1) http://www.istockanalyst.com/article/viewiStockNews/articleid/3455252)
(2) http://midtownalleyproject.typepad.com/map_midtown_alley_project/2009/05/index.html

Impermanence

Everything changes.

This wall has no mural. Last time I saw this wall, it was graced with a wonderful mural, but yesterday when I visited to take photos and get a closer look, I found this blandly painted wall.

In December, Shaun Turner painted an intricate and interesting mural along this wall next to the courtyard of Sugar Plum Vegan Bakery Cafe at 2309 K Street. Fortunately, Russ Andris took a photo of the mural soon after it was created and you should visit his site to see a photo of the short-lived mural.

When I visited yesterday and found the blank wall, I asked after the mural at Never Felt Better Vegan Shop. Sounds like the appropriate permission/agreement was not sought before the mural was painted. Here is a Sacramento Press article on the story.

Unfortunate events leading to the loss of a beautiful mural! But there are plans to build a patio wall that will be home to another mural.